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Interview Questions

Interview Questions

Interviews often take a very similar format to ones you have been to before. As a result you will often be asked the same questions at interviews throughout your career. Here’s a few of them with a little information on what you should consider before you answer.


Why are you looking for a new job?

This is not a trick question so do not make some grand claim about why you want to move. Be honest, but be careful not to be derogative or overly negative about your previous employer. For example, instead of saying ‘my boss is rubbish’ say something like ‘my current employer does not invest in management training and I feel as though I am doing a lot of my superiors’ work, as a result I want to move on and be recognised for that effort’.


Why do you want to work for our company?

Again, employers really want to know what drew you to their organisation. You should have researched the company and the way it works, so point out the aspects of it that you like. Point out what parts of the role really interest you and why you think you would be a great fit.


What strengths and weaknesses do you have?

When answering this question be honest, but not cheesy. Make sure you talk about strengths that are positive and relevant to the role and focus on one negative that is irrelevant, but finish that by pointing out how you are trying to overcome or improve that particular thing.


Why should we offer you the role?

If this question is posed ensure you talk about the positive aspects of your experience and skills that relate to the role. Also, try and pick up on what the interviewer is looking for and include that too.


Give an example of where you have……

….dealt with a difficult employee? ….performed above and beyond duty? ….used your management skills? There are many endings to this question, but all have the same requirement – you need to highlight something positive that you have done and relate it to the role in question. Part of your preparation should be to go through these kinds of questions and rehearse positive answers.


Where do you want to be in five years’ time?

This can be a difficult question to answer as you may not see yourself with the same employer in five years’ time, but you shouldn’t say this. Look at how the company is structured before your interview and try to position yourself somewhere within it. Alternatively, point out extra responsibilities or levels of management you may want to be at without referring to any company.


What is your proudest achievement?

As with many of these questions, you should try and relate this to a skill the employer is after. Keep it work related and ensure it is positive all the way through – better to talk about an employee you nurtured through to management level than an accident at work that you dealt with.


Name a time where you have made an error and how you resolved it?

This is another tricky question! Make sure your answer is about something that was an innocent accident as opposed to something caused by ineptitude and try to keep it to something not related to a key aspect of the position you are interviewing for.

- See more at: http://www.goldgroup.co.uk/interview-questions#sthash.xmODbN3p.dpuf

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